Monthly Archives: January 2016

Spirit, Will & Destiny: Harnessing Your Power This Winter

snowy winter plant

Fate whispers to the warrior
“You cannot withstand the storm”
and the warrior whispers back
“I am the storm”                                                          – Author Unknown

In Chinese Medicine Theory, every season/channel/element is connected with a spirit. The spirit of the Kidney channel is called the zhi.  As outlined in the Huang di Nei Jing, “The Spirit of the Kidneys, the zhi, rules the will, desire, ambition, and survival instinct.”

As with everything, there is a yin and yang aspect to our zhi. The yang component is the more active side, representing effort, determination, and willpower. It is the motivational facet of our ambition – the putting forth of effort to bring us to our goals. When our kidney yang is weak, it leaves us passive and unassertive. When it is overactive or forced, we easily burn out or deplete ourselves.

The yin aspect to our zhi represents something deeper inside of us. It is a persistent, unconscious drive that guides our choices on a more spiritual level, aligned with our higher purpose or fate.  It is that little voice inside coaxing us gently in the right direction as it advocates for our inner truth. This more intangible part of our will is best accessed during self-reflection and meditation – activities encouraged during the winter season. When our kidney yin is weak, it causes a disturbance in this aspect of our spirit, inducing agitation, discontent, fear, and the inability to act.

When we can connect the yin and yang, focusing our efforts on answering to our true calling, our spirit is at peace. This requires the discipline to discover who we are at our core and the bravery to act congruently. By letting our instincts guide us, we can begin to align our actions with our inner awareness, bringing us closer to achieving our highest potential and living a more purposeful, fulfilling life.

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Endings and New Beginnings

lotus lightAs we say goodbye to 2015 and usher in the new year, we are presented with an opportunity to reflect on the past and evaluate how we’d like to move forward in the future. While many of us approach the new year with optimism, quite often as the minutia of our day-to-day lives takes over, we lose focus of our resolutions, falling back into old, comfortable patterns.

In the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (Book 1, Pada 28), he discusses mantrum, “that which keeps the mind steady and produces the proper effect.” The idea is that constant repetition, or japa, of one specific word/goal/desire/action will create a habit, until eventually we “imbibe the qualities” of the thing we repeat.

Pada 32 reads, Tat Pratisedhartham Eka Tattva Bhyasah, “The practice of concentration on a single subject [or the use of one technique] is the best way to prevent the obstacles and their accompaniments.” In his discussion of this Pada, Sri Swami Satchidananda enforces that we must keep digging, or working at our goal, even if we encounter obstacles. Steadying the mind on the single object of our attention allows us to give it our full focus and power. This is not to say  obsess, but to stay on one track, so the bigger meaning and ultimate transformation can be revealed.

The idea that concentration is a practice rings very true for me. It requires that we are deliberate in our efforts. To simplify does not necessarily mean or goal is simple, but rather it is pure and undisrupted by distraction, fear and doubt.

He sums it up beautifully saying, “Stick to one thing and forge ahead with that. Why do you want to have this one-pointed concentration? To make the mind clear so you can transcend it. You are not going to cling to the object but just use it as a ladder to climb up. Once you have reached the roof you leave the ladder behind.”

So in thinking of New Years resolutions, perhaps this year we can all choose to focus on one thing that is really tugging at our hearts, and let this year be a practice in concentration on our ability to see it through.

 

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